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Bands might not like to hear it, but after a decade of cultural collapse culminating with the first pandemic of the new century, the way we consume music has changed. 

We observed this for a while, especially after witnessing Vaporwave’s cultural and behavioural impact among Millenials. Let’s make it clear that this is not about 80’s synth music or Lofi beats. It is about new emerging formats, aesthetics and states of mind.

So, how will this affect rock sub-genres? 

Your three-minutes radio format is still there, and moshing will one day come back. But there is a new way to consume music, more cerebral and insular. We are starting to make playlists based on our moods and actions. And with time, this will slowly change the way bands experience and write music.

When we heard ‘Wonderflow’ by Bloomcore, it finally hit us. 

Post-rock is ready to go. It’s a sub-genre that already shares the same characteristics of chillout and study music. Songs tend to be longer, elegant and brainy.

Bloomcore is undoubtedly not the only one tapping into the reframing of post-rock. But is the first that made it abundantly clear to us in all it does, from his understated image to his narrative and design. 

In his own words: ‘I am exploring the concept of flow, playing with the line between attentive listening and meditation.’

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